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Archive for the month “November, 2016”

An America I Do Not Know

Ken Kastle is a parishioner with me at our church St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church in Abington, PA. He writes a blog called “Looking at Things Through My Eyes.” Mr. Kastle has had a long career in education and often views his politics as I do, so I often find his blog posts compelling. Below is one of the posts to his blog, enjoy!

Looking At Things Thru My Eyes

November 9, 2016

I awoke this morning to an America I do not know—an America that just elected as its next president a man whose only qualification for this high position is that he conducted a campaign that appealed to the basest instincts of our many of our citizens.

I believe it is universally agreed that Donald Trump has no other qualifications for the presidency. He has absolutely no experience in governing. He says he is extremely rich, a claim that could not be verified because he refused to release his tax returns. He is best known by the public as a reality TV star. Many of his statements lead many to believe he is a racist and an anti-Semite. He is a misogynist, as demonstrated by his vulgar comments about a variety of women during his campaign. To some, he is a failed businessman, capitalizing on three bankruptcies that…

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Yessource: Yes live in Amsterdam 1/21/72

Here are my latest uploads to YesSource, my Yes rarities youtube page (about which you can read here).  This post is another addition to my series of Yes music posts.  I started this series here and a collection of all my Yes-related posts is here.  Yes, of course, is a, if not the, premier progressive rock band, and I am an enormous fan of it.

You can see all of my Yessource uploads here.

My latest YesSource uploads can be found here:

 

Doggone It! Court Cannot Condone Canine Custody

Many Americans have pets, and regardless of whether these pets are dogs, cats, lizards or fish, many pet owners think of their pets as members of the family. What happens when a pet is owned by a married couple who decide to divorce? The landmark Pennsylvania Superior Court case of Desanctis v. Pritchard, 803 A.2d 230 (2002) has answered this question rather definitively.

In Desanctis, the parties were married for about nine years. While they were married, they purchased their family dog, Barney, from the SPCA. As part of their divorce agreement, the parties, using terms typically reserved for child custody matters, awarded wife “full custody” of Barney while husband received what is tantamount to “visitation.”

Not long after their divorce, wife moved a fair distance away from husband and discontinued making Barney available to the husband for visits. Due to wife’s actions, husband filed a complaint against wife in equity. Husband sought injunctive relief to, inter alia, force wife to provide Barney to him, and modify the “custody” arrangement for Barney to ensure he had more time with his pooch. Wife filed preliminary objections to husband’s complaint that were granted by the Court of Common Pleas, which resulted in the dismissal of husband’s complaint, leading him to file an appeal to Pennsylvania Superior Court.

In its review of husband’s complaint and the preliminary objections, and the applicable law, the Pennsylvania Superior Court first pointed out that pets, regardless of our emotional attachment to them, are simply personal property. The court ruled that the agreement explicitly awarded the dog to wife. The court further ruled that any terms in an agreement which award a type of custody of the dog are void on their face.

Although it may be tough for animal lovers to hear, the court, rather bluntly, stated that a visitation schedule for a dog is analogous, in law, “to a visitation schedule for a table or a lamp.” As a result, pursuant to 23 Pa.C.S.A. Section 3503, property rights dependant upon a marital relationship are terminated upon divorce and, therefore, pursuant to 23 Pa.C.S.A. 3504, the parties to a divorce are to have “complete freedom” as to their property upon divorce. An agreement to somehow share property is not, by definition, complete freedom.

So, a divorce, in addition to dissolving the relationship between a husband and wife, also serves to potentially dissolve the relationship with a person and his pet. This is important to remember when separating as one may want to claim the pet as soon as possible in order to try and do as much as possible to retain the pet post-divorce.

Originally published in Upon Further Review on June 21, 2016 and can be found here and reprinted in Volume 39, Issue No. 1, March/April 2017 edition of the “Pennsylvania Family Lawyer” (see here).

Giving thanks for these 7 must-read non-US YA reads of 2016

Here is the latest post by Angela and Daz Croucher to their blog A.D. Croucher! They are up-and-coming young adult authors. Check them out!

A.D. Croucher

Monsters, music, psychopaths, love stories, and more await you in these 7 essential YA reads from outside the US.

my-sister-rosa

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YesSource: Yes live on November 24, 1971

Here are my latest uploads to YesSource, my Yes rarities youtube page (about which you can read here).  This post is another addition to my series of Yes music posts.  I started this series here and a collection of all my Yes-related posts is here.  Yes, of course, is a, if not the, premier progressive rock band, and I am an enormous fan of it.

You can see all of my Yessource uploads here.

My latest YesSource uploads can be found here:

Liberalism and Islam

This is from edwardfeser.blogspot.com which you can find here.  This blog is written by Edward Feser who is a Christian philosopher who I have been recently introduced to who I think provides effective clear, sobering, and direct responses to the advance of secular culture.

Here is a portion of recent piece of his which I thought was rather edifying:

Note: What follows is pretty long, especially if you think of it as a blog post.  So think of it instead as an article.  The topic does not, in any event, lend itself to brevity.  Nor do I think it ideal to break up the flow of the argument by dividing the piece into multiple posts.  So here it is in one lump.  It is something of a companion piece to my recent post about whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God.  Critics of that post will, I think, better understand it in light of this one.

 

In an article in The New Criterion over a decade ago, the late political scientist Kenneth Minogue noted a developing tendency in contemporary progressivism toward “Christophobia,” a movement beyond mere disbelief in Christian doctrine toward outright hostility.  The years since have hardly made Minogue’s observation less timely.  The New Atheism, the first stirrings of which Minogue cited in the article, came to full prominence (and acquired the “New Atheism” label) later in the decade in which he wrote.  The Obama administration’s attempt to impose its contraception mandate on Catholic institutions evinces a disdain for rights of conscience that would have horrified earlier generations of liberals.  Opponents of “same-sex marriage” have in recent years found themselves subject to loss of employment, cyber-mobbing, and even death threats — all in the name of progressivism.  If contempt for Christian moral teaching still hides behind a mask of liberal neutrality, Hillary Clinton let that mask slip further still when she recently insisted that “deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed” in order to accommodate easy access to abortion.  Not all liberals approve of these developments, of course.  But demographic trends indicate that a Christophobic brand of progressivism may have little difficulty finding new recruits.
Now, how do contemporary liberals view Islam?  How would one expect them to, given their principles, and given the principles and practice of Islam?  Consider that, like Christianity, Islamic moral teaching unequivocally condemns homosexual behavior, extramarital sex, and the sexual revolution in general.  Feminism has, to put it mildly, had little effect on Islam, which is traditionally highly patriarchal.  In Islam, men can have multiple wives, but wives cannot have multiple husbands.  Men can marry non-Muslim women, but women cannot marry non-Muslim men.  The authority of husbands over wives goes far beyond anything feminists objected to in 1950s America.  Rules governing divorce, custody of children, inheritance, and legal testimony all strongly favor men.  In many modern Muslim countries, the implementation of this patriarchal system takes forms which modern Western women would find unimaginably repressive.  Women are expected to cover their bodies in public to a greater or lesser extent, the burqa being the most extreme case.  In Saudi Arabia, women are forbidden to drive, to go out in public without a chaperone, or to interact with men to whom they are not related.  In some Muslim countries, husbands have a right to discipline their wives with beatings.  In some, female genital mutilation is widely practiced.  “Honor killings” of women thought to have brought shame upon their families often occur not only in Muslim countries, but in Western countries with large Muslim populations.  Of course, not all Muslims approve of all of this.  Nor or is it by any means the whole story about women in Islamic society, and Muslims emphasize the way Islam improved the situation of women compared to pre-Islamic Arabia.   The point, though, is that it is far from being a marginal part of the story. ”

You can read the rest here.

Someone Explain This to Me

Ken Kastle is a parishioner with me at our church St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church in Abington, PA. He writes a blog called “Looking at Things Through My Eyes.” Mr. Kastle has had a long career in education and often views his politics as I do, so I often find his blog posts compelling. Below is one of the posts to his blog, enjoy!

Looking At Things Thru My Eyes

RealClearPolitics.com provides the current approval rating for the U.S. Congress as reported by six polls. The reported ratings range from a high of 19% (reported by the Monmouth poll) to a low of 13% (as reported by both the Economist and PPP (D) polls). The average approval  rating reported in these polls was 15.2%.

By any measure of satisfaction, these ratings are abysmal. Any worker given that kind of rating would be fired immediately.

p.s. The most recent weekly average job approval rating for President Obama reported by the Gallup poll was 51%. And, this is the man being excoriated by the candidates of the opposition party for what they call his poor job performance.

Can someone explain this to me?

According to The Center for Responsive Politics (as reported at www.opensecrets.org/bigpicture/reelect.php), the reelection rate in the 2014 mid-term election for incumbents in the U.S. House of Representatives was 95% and…

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Yessource: The Fragile Sessions

Here are my latest uploads to YesSource, my Yes rarities youtube page (about which you can read here).  This post is another addition to my series of Yes music posts.  I started this series here and a collection of all my Yes-related posts is here.  Yes, of course, is a, if not the, premier progressive rock band, and I am an enormous fan of it.

You can see all of my Yessource uploads here.

My latest YesSource uploads can be found here:

 

GOVERNMENT AGENCY MORASS

Check out Faye Cohen’s post to her blog Toughlawyerlady!

ToughLawyerLady

Another Presidential race year is upon us. Not only is it upon us, but it seems like news about the aspiring Presidential candidates is being ingrained in our pores. If the strategy of politicians and the media is to annoy us, exhaust us, shock us, and nearly destroy our faith in the democratic process, they have accomplished these things this year.

I will not discuss individual Presidential candidates or their views, or my candidate preferences, but I want to discuss the state of our local, state and federal government agenciesfrom the perspective of our attorneys, who deal with these agencies on a regular basis.  Due to our interaction with these agencies I fear for the state of our government. I was going to title this blog “We Need a Revolution”, but I thought the CIA might visit me if I did. But clearly, some action has to be taken to…

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November 2016: “The Evangelist” Newsletter from St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church, Abington, PA

The Evangelist is the monthly newsletter of St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church in Abington, Pennsylvania.  Below is the November 2016 issue of The Evangelist which you can also read here in .pdf format.

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