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The Miracle of Science

Every now and again I come across a fantastic article the warrants posting here; I recently came across one in Splice Today by my old philosophy professor Dr. Crispin Sartwell from back in my Penn State days which, I thought, was pretty insightful. Be edified.

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Can it save us from itself?

“Science” is a good thing for traumatized progressives to march for, allowing them to express their commitment simultaneously to truth itself and to the epistemic and cash-money hierarchy recognized by their kind. There were no anti-science counter-demonstrations, partly because almost everyone recognizes science as having a kind of overwhelming credibility; no one explicitly opposes it in general, even if they haven’t quite accepted human-caused climate change. Many purport to think of it as the only source of truth.

“How did America rise up from a backwoods country to be one of the greatest nations the world has ever known?” asks Neil de Grasse Tyson in a video which he describes as containing “the most important words I have ever spoken.” It’s technology, man, which he folds effortlessly into science. As the video unspools, it shows an inspiring montage of extreme carbon-emitting activities: rockets rising into the sky, steam power from coal plants, cities aglow with incandescent light. All that’s missing is the mushroom cloud… of science!

Indeed, even on Tyson’s conception, science has had some really terrifying results, such as industrial agriculture and ever-new generations of weaponry. According to his view, science is now the only hope for ameliorating the conditions it has itself ushered in. As to how science stands today in relation to the objective truth, I wouldn’t assume that this time around the results will stand up permanently or the effects wind up being benign. Every time they tell you what’s true, take it seriously and cock a skeptical eyebrow. Any other attitude is not compatible with science.

Tyson says that, in the 21st century, people other than himself “have lost the ability to judge what is true and what is not.” The question is easy for people like Tyson: “science” is what is true, denying it or even quibbling with some particular result, is a sign not only that you probably didn’t do that well on the SAT’s, but that you’re irrational and evil. And since few of us are in a position to check the results of any particular research project, we must accept the deliverances of science on authority. For Tyson, the distinction between what’s true and what’s not is identical to the distinction between what people like him agree on and what they agree against. If someone “doesn’t believe in science,” they’re questioning his authority and that of his ilk.

This dogmatism is incompatible with science’s own self-understanding as producing provisional, challengeable knowledge. And it’s incompatible with the history of science. Think for just a moment what you would’ve been accepting if you had “accepted science” 50 years ago: what you would’ve believed about the nature of the universe (for example, that it’s in a steady state, rather than expanding), or about what food or pharmaceuticals could be safely consumed. What you’re urged today to accept without question as a badge of your goodness and rationality and your social status will quite likely be revised tomorrow. That’s what is good about science, actually.

But science was presented in those marches not only as consisting of thousands of specific assertions you’re called upon to accept, but as a token of identity. A defense of science is a defense, among other things, of academic institutions as being arbiters of knowledge and ignorance. More to the point, academics and scientists feel their funding to be under threat by the Trump administration.

I don’t think the “science wars” are wars about truth. They’re wars about class, identity, and the shape of history. The real avatars of the science march were Bill Nye the Science Guy and Ms. Frizzle, the cartoon teacher from The Magic School Bus. These figures, along with Sesame Street and Barney, helped shape the consciousness of, let’s say, middle-class white American kids. Nye and Frizzle spent half their time instructing and the other half enthusing about the wonders of science itself. Now they’re figures of preternatural power, battling the forces of ignorance in the streets.

It strikes me that it’d behoove us to do whatever the scientists tell us to do. They have access to biological, chemical, and nuclear agents, which they developed themselves, and the expertise to weaponize them. Watch these people bring down the Internet, if they want, or seize control of the grid. Perhaps we have focused too much on the threat of radical Islamism, and too little on the threat of rigorous scientism.

Originally published on April 24, 2017 and can be found here.

Tactical Retreat: The Bequest

My friend and co-worker Brian M. Lambert has founded an online sketch comedy project called Tactical Retreat which you can find here on Facebook and here on Youtube.

As Tactical Retreat releases new videos, I will post them here.  So far, I have found them rather funny and clever and they seem to get better with each release.

Here are the links to Tactical Retreat‘s previously released sketches:

Tactical Retreat‘s latest sketch is entitled “The Bequest” can be viewed below.

Tactical Retreat: Frequent Flyer

My friend and co-worker Brian M. Lambert has founded an online sketch comedy project called Tactical Retreat which you can find here on Facebook and here on Youtube.

As Tactical Retreat releases new videos, I will post them here.  So far, I have found them rather funny and clever and they seem to get better with each release.

Here are the links to Tactical Retreat‘s previously released sketches:

Tactical Retreat‘s latest sketch is entitled “Frequent Flyer” can be viewed below.

Tactical Retreat: Guilty Pleasures

My friend and co-worker Brian M. Lambert has founded an online sketch comedy project called Tactical Retreat which you can find here on Facebook and here on Youtube.

As Tactical Retreat releases new videos, I will post them here.  So far, I have found them rather funny and clever and they seem to get better with each release.

Here are the links to Tactical Retreat‘s previously released sketches:

Tactical Retreat‘s latest sketch is entitled “Guilty Pleasures” can be viewed below.

Putting nature on the rack

This is from edwardfeser.blogspot.com which you can find here.  This blog is written by Edward Feser who is a Christian philosopher who I have been recently introduced to who I think provides effective clear, sobering, and direct responses to the advance of secular culture.

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What was it that distinguished the modern scientific method inaugurated by Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, and Co. from the science of the medievals?  One common answer is that the moderns required empirical evidence, whereas the medievals contented themselves with appeals to the authority of Aristotle.  The famous story about Galileo’s Scholastic critics’ refusing to look through his telescope is supposed to illustrate this difference in attitudes.

 

The problem with this answer, of course, is that it is false.  For one thing, the telescope story is (like so many other things everyone “knows” about the Scholastics and about the Galileo affair) a legend.  For another, part of the reason Galileo’s position was resisted was precisely because there were a number of respects in which it appeared to conflict with the empirical evidence.  (For example, the Copernican theory predicted that Venus should sometimes appear six times larger than it does at other times, but at first the empirical evidence seemed not to confirm this, until telescopes were developed which could detect the difference; the predicted stellar parallax did not receive empirical confirmation for a long time; and so forth.)

Then there is the fact that the medievals were simply by no means hostile to the idea that empirical evidence is the foundation of knowledge; on the contrary, it was a standard Scholastic slogan that “there is nothing in the intellect that was not first in the senses.”  Indeed, Bacon regarded his Scholastic predecessors as if anything too quick to believe the evidence of the senses.  The first of the “Idols of the Mind” that he famously critiques, namely the “Idols of the Tribe,” included a tendency to take the deliverances of sensory experience for granted.  The senses could, in Bacon’s view, too readily be deceived, and needed to be corrected by carefully controlling the conditions of observation and developing scientific instruments.  And in general, the early moderns regarded much of what the senses tell us about the natural world — such as what they tell us about secondary qualities like color and temperature — to be false.
So, it is simply not the case that the difference between the medievals and the early moderns was that the latter were more inclined to trust empirical evidence.  On the contrary, there is a sense in which that is precisely the reverse of the truth.

 

Where empirical evidence is concerned, the real difference might, to oversimplify, be put as follows.  Both the medievals and the early moderns regarded sensory experience as a crucial witness to the truth about the natural world.  But whereas the medievals regarded it as a more or less friendly witness, the moderns regarded it as a more or less hostile witness.  You can, from both sorts of witness, derive the truth.  But the methods will be different.

 

Hence, a friendly witness can more or less be asked directly for the information you want.  That doesn’t mean he might not sometimes need to be prodded to answer.  Even if he is honest, he might be shy, or reluctant to divulge something embarrassing, or just not very articulate.  It also doesn’t mean that everything he says can be taken at face value.  He may be forgetful, or confused, or just mistaken now and again.  A hostile witness, by contrast, though he has the information you want, cannot with confidence be asked directly.  Even if he is articulate, has a crystal clear memory, etc., he may simply refuse to answer, or may persistently beat around the bush, or may flat-out lie, seriously and repeatedly.  Thus, he may have to be tricked into giving you the information you want, like the Jack Nicholson character in A Few Good Men.  Or you may be tempted to threaten or beat it out of him, like one of the cops in L.A. Confidential would.  So, you might say that whereas the medieval Aristotelian scientist has a conversation with nature, the early modern Baconian scientist waterboards nature.  Hence the notorious Baconian talk about putting nature to the rack, torturing her for her secrets, etc.

 

Of course, this is melodramatic.  And to be fair, Bacon himself seems not to have put things quite the way commonly attributed to him (i.e. the stuff about torture and the rack).  All the same, the medievals and moderns do disagree about the degree to which the world of ordinary experience and the world that science reveals — what Wilfrid Sellars called “the manifest image” and “the scientific image” — correspond.  For the Aristotelian, philosophy and science are largely in harmony with common sense and ordinary experience.  To be sure, they get at much deeper levels of reality, and they correct common sense and ordinary experience around the edges, but they don’t overthrow common sense and ordinary experience wholesale.  For the moderns, by contrast, philosophy and science are likely radically to conflict with common sense and ordinary experience, and may indeed end up overthrowing them wholesale.

 

(This is not a difference concerning whether to accept the results of modern science, by the way.  It is a difference about how to interpret those results.  For example, it is a difference over whether to regard modern science as giving us a correct but merely partial description of nature — a description which needs to be supplemented by and embedded within an Aristotelian metaphysics and philosophy of nature — or whether to regard modern science instead as an exhaustive description of nature, and a complete metaphysics in its own right.)

 

The early moderns’ attitude of treating nature as a hostile witness — of thinking that the truth about nature is largely contrary to what ordinary experience would indicate — is one of the sources of the modern tendency to suppose that “things are never what they seem,” that traditional ideas are typically mere prejudices, that authorities and official stories of every kind need to be “unmasked,” and so forth.  Michael Levin has called this the “skim milk fallacy,” and I’ve often noted some of its social and moral consequences (e.g. here, here and here).  But these are merely byproducts of a much deeper metaphysical and epistemological revolution.

My Life in Concerts: the Complete List

Over the course of the last 23 plus years, I have enjoyed the opportunity to go and see many bands in a live setting.  As my readers know, I have seen Yes by far the most, but, contrary to popular belief, Yes (and their openers) is/are not the only band(s) I have ever seen live.

After so many years and shows, I thought it would be fun to try and list and catalogue all the shows I have seen.  I think the list below is about as comprehensive as I can create, and it does not, obviously, include live bands in bars and community festivals and such.

I have also, over the course of this blog, put up numerous posts of tour programs, tickets, reviews, and other things I have collected over the years at concerts.  Here they are below:

Here is, what I think, is my complete list of concerts (227):

Yes (24):

Porcupine Tree (8):

  • 6/23/01: NEARFest 2001
  • 7/26/02: Theater of the Living Arts (with Tim Reynolds)
  • 11/8/02: Tower Theater (with Yes)
  • 7/20/03: Trocadero Theater (with Opeth)
  • 5/21/05: Trocadero Theater (with Tunnels)
  • 9/27/05: Keswick Theater (with Robert Fripp)
  • 10/7/06: Keswick Theater (with ProjeKCt Six)
  • 9/26/09: Electric Factory (with King’s X)

The Musical Box (7):

  • 2/26/04: Keswick Theater
  • 7/9/04: NEARFest 2004
  • 12/17/04: Keswick Theater
  • 12/10/05: Tower Theater
  • 10/20/06: Tower Theater
  • 12/15/07: Tower Theater
  • 8/3/13: Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)

Renaissance (3):

  • 10/11/09: Keswick Theater
  • 6/23/12: NEARFest 2012
  • 8/3/13: Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)

Philadelphia Orchestra (3):

  • 4/5/05: Verizon Hall
  • 9/24/05: Verizon Hall
  • Another date: Mann Music Center

Änglagård (2):

  • 6/29/03 NEARFest 2003
  • 6/23/12 NEARFest 2012

Asia (2):

Banco del Mutuo Soccorso (2):

Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (2):

  • 8/1/96: Keswick Theater
  • 8/5/08: Mann Music Center (with Return to Forever)

DFA (2):

  • 6/17/00: NEARFest 2001
  • 6/20/09: NEARFest 2009

Echolyn (2):

  • 6/29/02: NEARFest 2002
  • 6/22/08: NEARFest 2008

Steve Hackett (2):

King Crimson (2):

Magma (2):

Mike Keneally Band (2):

  • 7/10/04: NEARFest 2004
  • 6/24/12: NEARFest 2012

PFM (2):

Riverside (2):

Tunnels (2):

  •  6/28/03: NEARFest 2003
  • 5/21/05: Trocadero Theater (with Porcupine Tree)

Van Der Graaf Generator (2):

  • 6/19/09: NEARFest 2009
  • 6/22/12: NEARFest 2012

Carl Palmer ELP Legacy Band (2):

  • 8/3/13 Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)
  • 8/15/17: Hershey Theater – Yestival Tour

Other (152):

  • Acoustic Trio (Stanley Clarke, Bela Fleck, Jean Luc Ponty): 8/12/05 Mann Music Center
  • After Crying: 6/24/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Alamaailman Vasarat: 6/28/03 NEARFest 2003
  • Alan Parsons Project: 6/27/98 Camden Blockbuster Center (with Yes)
  • Anderson/Ponty: 10/27/15 Keswick Theater
  • Anekdoten: 6/17/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Ange: 6/25/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Aranis: 6/22/12 NEARFest 2012
  • Astra: 6/19/10 NEARFest 2010
  • Beardfish: 6/21/09 NEARFest 2009
  • Bird Songs of the Mesozoic: 6/23/01 NEARFest 2001
  • The Black Eyed Peas (with Rita Marley and Stephen Marley): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Bon Jovi: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Cabezas de Cera: 6/20/09 NEARFest 2009
  • California Guitar Trio with Tony Levin: 6/24/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Camel: 6/29/03 NEARFest 2003
  • Canned Heat: 1/21/05 Keswick Theater (with Mountain and Vanilla Fudge)
  • Caravan: 6/30/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Dave Matthews Band: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Def Leppard: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Destiny’s Child: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Deus Ex Machina: 6/23/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Discipline: 6/21/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Dixie Dregs: 4/7/05 Theater of the Living Arts (with Steve Morse Band)
  • Djam Karet: 6/24/10: NEARFest 2001
  • DJ Green Lantern: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • DJ Jazzy Jeff (with Will Smith): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Bob Drake: 6/23/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Dream Theater: 9/3/04 Allentown Fairgrounds (with Yes)
  • KBB: 6/24/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Keith Emerson: 6/25/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Enchant: 6/30/02 NEARFest 2002
  • The Enid: 6/20/10 NEARFest 2010
  • Fish: 6/20/08 NEARFest 2008
  • The Flower Kings: 6/28/03 NEARFest 2003
  • FM: 6/24/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Forgas Band Phenomena: 6/19/10 NEARFest 2010
  • Peter Frampton: 6/15/10 Tower Theater (with Yes)
  • Robert Fripp: 9/27/05 Keswick Theater (with Porcupine Tree)
  • Frogg Cafe: 7/9/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Gerard: 6/30/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Glass Hammer: 6/29/03 NEARFest 2003
  • Gong: 6/20/09 NEARFest 2009
  • Gosta Berlings Saga: 6/24/12 NEARFest 2012
  • Josh Groban (with Sarah McLachlan): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Guapo: 6/25/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Peter Hammil: 6/21/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Happy the Man: 6/17/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Hatfield and the North: 6/23/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Hawkwind: 6/23/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Helmet of Gnats: 6/23/12 NEARFest 2012
  • Hidria Spacefolk: 7/11/04 NEARFest 2004
  • High Wheel: 6/28/03 NEARFest 2003
  • Steve Hillage: 6/19/09 NEARFest 2009
  • Allan Holdsworth: 6/22/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Iluvatar: 6/17/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Il Balletto di Bronzo: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Il Tempio delle Clessidre: 6/24/12 NEARFest 2012
  • Indukti: 6/24/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Iona: 6/19/10 NEARFest 2010
  • IQ: 7/9/05 NEARFest 2005
  • IZZ: 6/23/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Isildur’s Bane: 6/29/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Jars of Clay: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Jay-Z (with Linkin Park): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Jethro Tull: 8/9/03 MusikFest
  • Eddie Jobson / UKZ: 6/20/10: NEARFest 2010
  • Richard Leo Johnson: 6/24/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Kaiser Chiefs: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Kansas: 7/18/00 Camden Blockbuster Center (with Yes)
  • Toby Keith: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Kenso: 7/10/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Alicia Keys: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • King’s X: 9/26/09 Electric Factory (with Porcupine Tree)
  • Knight Area: 7/10/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Koenji Hyakkei: 6/21/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Kraan: 6/29/03 NEARFest 2003
  • La Maschera di Cera: 6/24/04: NEARFest 2007
  • La Torre dell’Alchimista: 6/29/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Le Orme: 7/10/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Linkin Park (with Jay-Z): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Liquid Tension Experiment: 6/21/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Magenta: 6/23/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Sean Malone: 7/11/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Michael Manring: 6/25/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Rita Marley and Stephen Marley (with The Black Eyed Peas ): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Maroon 5: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Sarah McLachlan  (with Josh Groban): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Metamorfosi: 7/11/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Miriodor: 6/29/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Moraine: 6/20/10 NEARFest 2010
  • Morglbl: 6/22/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Mountain: 1/21/05 Keswick Theater (with Canned Heat and Vanilla Fudge)
  • The Muffins: 7/10/05 NEARFest 2005
  • NeBeLNeST: 6/23/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Nektar: 6/29/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Nexus: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Niacin: 6/25/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Nicholas Payton Quintet: 10/19/97 Central PA Friends of Jazz
  • North Star: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Oblivion Sun: 6/20/09 NEARFest 2009
  • One Shot: 6/22/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Opeth: 7/20/03: Trocadero Theater (with Porcupine Tree)
  • Ozric Tentacles: 6/24/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Pallas: 7/10/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Par Lindh Project: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Matthew Parmenter: 7/10/05 NEARFest 2005
  • The Pineapple Thief: 6/20/10 NEARFest 2010
  • Richard Pinhas: 7/10/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Planet X: 7/11/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Present: 7/9/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Procol Harum: 7/20/12 Tower Theater (with Yes)
  • ProjeKCt Six: 10/7/06 Keswick Theater (with Porcupine Tree)
  • Proto-Kaw: 7/8/05: NEARFest 2005
  • Pure Reason Revolution: 6/24/04: NEARFest 2007
  • Quantum Fantasy: 6/21/09 NEARFest 2009
  • Radio Massacre International: 6/22/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Return to Forever: 8/5/08 Mann Music Center (with Bela Fleck and the Flecktones)
  • Tim Reynolds: 7/26/02: Theater of the Living Arts (with Porcupine Tree)
  • Robert Rich: 6/24/04: NEARFest 2007
  • Steve Roach: 7/9/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Todd Rundgren: 8/15/17: Hershey Theater – Yestival Tour
  • Scale the Summit: 8/3/13 Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)
  • The School of Rock: 8/3/13 Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)
  • Second Sufis: NEARFest 2003
  • Secret Oyster: 6/22/07: NEARFest 2007
  • Sleepytime Gorilla Museum: 629/03 NEARFest 2003
  • Will Smith (with DJ Jazzy Jeff): 7/2/05 Live 8
  • Spaced Out: 6/30/02 NEARFest 2002
  • Steve Morse Band: 4/7/05 Theater of the Living Arts (with Dixie Dregs)
  • Strawbs: 7/11/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Styx: 7/4/11 Camden Tweeter Center (with Yes)
  • Syd Arthur: 7/19/14 Upper Darby Tower Theater (with Yes)
  • Synergy (Larry Fast): 6/20/08 NEARFest 2008
  • Thinking Plague: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2000
  • Three Friends: 6/19/10 NEARFest 2010
  • The Tony Levin Band: 6/23/06 NEARFest 2006
  • Toto: 8/9/15: Borgata, Atlantic City (with Yes)
  • Transatlantic: 6/18/00 NEARFest 2001
  • Trettioariga Kriget: 6/21/09 NEARFest
  • Twelfth Night: 6/23/12 NEARFest 2012
  • U.K.: 6/24/12 NEARFest 2012
  • The Underground Railroad: 6/24/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Under the Sun: 6/24/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Univers Zero: 7/10/04 NEARFest 2004
  • Vanilla Fudge: 1/21/05 Keswick Theater (with Mountain and Canned Heat)
  • Volto!: 8/3/13 Camden Tweeter Center (with Yestival)
  • Rick Wakeman: 10/29/03 Electric Factory
  • Kanye West: 7/2/05 Live 8
  • White Willow: 6/23/01 NEARFest 2001
  • Wobbler: 7/9/05 NEARFest 2005
  • Yezda Urfa: 7/10/04 NEARFest

Porcupine Tree Posts Round Up

Porcupine Tree was, for a number of years, my favorite new progressive rock band and, as a result, I tried to go see them as much as I could when I was not seeing Yes.  I have posted about them a number of times in this blog and you can find those posts below:

 

 

Random Concert Ticket Photos

As my readers know, I am a very avid concert goer.  Granted, since I have had children, I have had less time and less money to dedicate to seeing shows, but I still try to get two or three in every year.

For fun, I have already posted some tickets before, which you can find here:

I have also been to a variety of shows that really do not fit into any categories and I have posted a sort of grab bag of tickets below for various and miscellaneous shows.

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  • Asia (a program from this show can be found here and a review here)

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NEARFest 2012 – Apocalypse Event Program

This post is in my series regarding the North East Art Rock Festival (NEARFest).  You can find all of my posts regarding NEARFest here and I started the series here.

At each NEARFest, the Festival organizers created a weekend event program.  I was lucky enough to have purchased one from all of the Festivals I attended, and I will post photographs of them all here.  These programs were expertly crafted with many beautiful photographs and well written descriptions and histories and such.  Of course, they also contain their fair share of ads, as one may expect.  I got most (maybe all) of the programs I purchased at NEARFest over the years autographed by the artist who drew its cover and, in this case, that was Yes and Asia cover artist Roger Dean.

I was able to purchase a program at NEARFest 2012, and I thought it would be fun to post it here for prog rock fans who may not have had the opportunity to go to the Festival and/or purchase the program.  Accordingly, I took photographs of each page of the program and posted them below.

I also posted a review of NEARFest 2012 which you can see here.  The review contains many photographs from the event.

Enjoy!

 

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NEARFest 2010 Event Program

This post is in my series regarding the North East Art Rock Festival (NEARFest).  You can find all of my posts regarding NEARFest here and I started the series here.

At each NEARFest, the Festival organizers created a weekend event program.  I was lucky enough to have purchased one from all of the Festivals I attended, and I will post photographs of them all here.  These programs were expertly crafted with many beautiful photographs and well written descriptions and histories and such.  Of course, they also contain their fair share of ads, as one may expect.  I got most (maybe all) of the programs I purchased at NEARFest over the years autographed by the artist who drew its cover and, in this case, that was Yes and Asia cover artist Roger Dean.

I was able to purchase a program at NEARFest 2010, and I thought it would be fun to post it here for prog rock fans who may not have had the opportunity to go to the Festival and/or purchase the program.  Accordingly, I took photographs of each page of the program and posted them below.

I also posted a review of NEARFest 2010 which you can see here.  The review contains many photographs from the event.

Enjoy!

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