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Nativity Scene On Indiana County Building Property Held Unconstitutional

This is from religionclause.blogspot.com which you can find here:

In Woodring v. Jackson County, Indiana, (SD IN, April 30, 2020), an Indiana federal district court held that the Establishment Clause is violated by a nativity scene displayed on the lawn of an historical courthouse that now houses county offices. The court first concluded that plaintiff has standing to sue:

Her injury is the direct contact she must endure with a display that she alleges violates the Establishment Clause in the course of exercising her rights as a citizen of Jackson County.

Moving to the merits of the claim, the court said in part:

Here … the Nativity scene is not on its own. It is accompanied by two other arguably secular symbols of Christmas: Santa Claus and a group of Christmas carolers….

Nevertheless, two facts persuade the Court that this Nativity scene would give a reasonable observer the impression that the government is endorsing a religion. The first of those facts is the geography of the display…. Santa and the carolers are placed to the far side of the display, away from the more centralized Nativity display, which straddles the sidewalk subdividing the lawn…. The crèche is the vast majority of the display … making it appear much larger than the solitary Santa figure…. The carolers have been placed in the back of the display, lessening the attention they would draw from an observer….

The second fact that convinces the Court that the Nativity scene would give the impression of a religious endorsement is the scene’s history. For many years, it was only a Nativity scene, with no secular elements at all….But in 2018, in response to a letter from the Freedom from Religion Foundation questioning the display’s constitutionality, the President of the County Commissioners …physically moved Santa Claus and his sleigh and reindeer and the carolers to a place nearer the crèche…. The addition of less prominent secular symbols at the fringes of the display is not enough to counteract the impression a reasonable observer would have gotten from seeing the Nativity display placed on the lawn of the Courthouse for nearly 20 years. The Court has no doubt that a sufficient balancing between secular and nonsecular elements could bring this display into harmony with the First Amendment despite its history, but that balancing has not occurred here. Thus, the display fails the endorsement test.

You can learn more about this issue here.

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